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Rare manuscript plan of Genoa

Title
Plan de la Premiere et de la Seconde Enceinte de la Ville de Genes.
Author
GAYET
Publication date
[1746].
Dimensions
490 by 580mm (19.25 by 22.75 inches).
Price
£1,500
Reference
2695

Description

Manuscript plan with original hand-colour, dissected and mounted on linen, profile of battlements, key to map below title.

Notes

Deatailed plan of the Genoa's fortifications during the siege of 1746.

The Siege of Genoa took place in 1746 during the War of the Austrian Succession when an Allied force of Austrians, Sardinians soldiers and British sailors besieged the capital of the Republic of Genoa. The city ultimately surrendered to commander Antoniotto Botta Adorno, after being abandoned by its principal allies France and Spain. The manner in which Austria had negotiated a separate surrender that didn't include Britain or Sardinia angered their allies, and for a while the British fleet under George Townshend were instructed by Arthur Villettes to continue their blockade of the city in protest until ordered to cease it by the Duke of Newcastle in London.

Scale: 11cm to 1km

Provenance

From the Library of the Dukes of Luynes.

Charles Louis d'Albert de Luynes (1717-1771) was a French nobleman and member of the House of Albert. He was the fifth Duke of Luynes as well as Duke of Chevreuse.

He took part in the war in 1733 in the War of the Polish Succession. He also took part in campaigns in 1735 and 1745, the latter in the War of the Austrian Succession, and was injured in combat at Sahay at the head of the Dragoons. He participated in the attack of Prague in 1742, and also assisted in various sieges and battles of the era.

In 1754, he was created a Colonel General of the Dragoons. From 1757 to 1771, he was the Gouverneur de Paris (Military governor of Paris), an ancient and prestigious rank representing the king in the capital. He also was created a Knight of the Order of the Holy Spirit at Versailles on 2 February 1759.

He died in Paris in his Hôtel. He was buried at the Chapelle de Saint Jean l'Évangeliste at the Église Saint-Sulpice, Paris.