First edition of this translation by Ogilby illustrated with more than seventy engravings by Hollar

By HOLLAR, Wenceslaus, and VIRGIL, 1654 
£2,500
£2,000

Opera per Johannem Ogilvium edita et sculpturis aenis adoranata.

Art & Architecture
  • Author: HOLLAR, Wenceslaus, and VIRGIL
  • Publication place: London
  • Publisher: Thomas Roycroft
  • Publication date: 1654–1658.
  • Physical description: First edition. Two volumes, folio (409 by 258mm). Title printed in red and black, (vol. one) 2ff. 447 pp., portrait frontispiece of Ogilby by W. Faithorne after Lely, additional frontispiece by P. Lombart after F. Cleyn (trimmed), 94 full-page engravings after F. Cleyn with coats of arms inscribed underneath each of them, of which 33 by Hollar, folding map titled Aenae troiani navigation” by Hollar, 12 engraved initials and headpieces, 4 plates cut down and mounted ;(vol. two) 7 ff., 586 pp. portrait frontispiece of Ogilby by W. Faithorne after Lely (trimmed), additional frontispiece by P. Lombart & Richer after F. Cleyn, 98 full-page engravings with coats of arms inscribed underneath each of them, after F. Cleyn, of which 39 by Hollar, folding map titled Aenae troiani navigation” by Hollar mounted on tab, 22 engraved initials and headpieces. Late eighteenth or early nineteenth century Russian calf, borders formed by a roll in blind, with gilt fillets, gilt tooled and paneled backs, corners and hinges slightly rubbed, title and author inscribed in gold on a green morocco lettering piece, with all edges in gilt.
  • Inventory reference: 18629

Notes

John Ogilby (1600–1676) was one of the most interesting British mapmakers, and translator of Homer and Virgil. After a slightly disreputable start in life, Ogilby gained a certain notoriety in 1637 when he opened the first theatre of Ireland in Dublin. Here he mingled dance and drama with fluency, but was beset with financial difficulties and the institution had to close in 1641. In 1650, he published his first important work The fables of Aesop paraphras’d in verse, illustrated by F. Cleyn. The second volume of Virgil’s translation was published in 1658, the year of Lord Cromwell’s death. After a period out of favour during the Commonwealth, the Restoration of Charles II brought fortune back to Ogilby with a commission to help in the arrangements for the coronation in 1660 with the composing of speeches and songs. Following the Great Fire of London in 1666, he repositioned himself as a publisher specializing in geographic and cartographic material, and in the following decade produced two incredibly accurate plans of London, and his magnum opus: Britannia, Volume the First: or, an Illustration of the Kingdom of England and Dominion of Wales’ (1675) the first published road-book of any country in western Europe. The volume was hugely successful, and much reprinted and, when the copyright expired, heavily copied by subsequent mapmakers. 

Provenance


Sir Edward Henry Scott (1840–1880) 4th Baronet of Lytchett Minster, bibliophile (bookplate).

Bibliography

  1. NHG Hollar 1344, 1351, 1353, 1355–1395
  2. Pennington 290–332
  3. Lowndes, V, p. 2776
  4. Brunet V p. 1289.

Image gallery

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