British Admiralty charts of the Baltic Sea

By THE ADMIRALTY, 1855 
£10,000
£8,000

[Composite Marine Atlas of the Baltic Sea].

Europe
  • Author: THE ADMIRALTY
  • Publication place: London
  • Publisher: Hydrographic Department of the British Admiralty
  • Publication date: c1855
  • Physical description: Large folio (680 by 530mm), manuscript contents list, 28 engraved sea chart (six double-page and one with contemporary hand-colour), contemporary half-calf over marbled paper boards, black morocco label to upper cover.
  • Inventory reference: 18465

Notes

Rare composite pilot of British Admiralty charts of the Baltic Sea.

Several of the charts are based on the work of the Swedish Admiral Gustav Klint, whose Sverijas sjoatlas’ was published be 1795 and 1840, together with other surveys by the Russian, Prussian, Danish and French navies — the Gulf of Finland is from Fleurieu’s great Baltic Pilot.

The British Hydrographic Office was founded in 1795 by George III, who appointed Alexander Dalrymple as the first Hydrographer to the Admiralty. The first charts were produced in 1800. Unlike the U. S. Coast Survey the Hydrographic Office was given permission to sell charts to the public and they produced a great number of sea charts covering every corner of the globe. Most of the Admiralty charts produced by the Hydrographic Office delineated coastline as well as high and low water marks and depth of water as established by soundings. In addition these charts included information on shoals, reefs, and other navigational hazards that plagued mariners across the world. Thanks to the innovations of Sir Francis Beaufort, who developed the Beaufort Scale of wind strength, the British Hydrographic Office became one of the leading producers of sea charts.

List of Charts

1. General Chart of the Baltic Sea, 1854. [key chart to the following 12 charts]
2–13:
(i)Femern to Bornholm, from Royal Danish and Prussian Surveys
(ii-vi) Admiral Klint’s Swedish Survey.
(vii‑x) Russian Surveys
(xi-xii) Danish, Prussian, and Russian surveys.
14. Entrance to the Great and Little Belts 1853, from a Royal Danish Survey.
15. Entrance to the Baltic (six charts on one sheet), 1852.
16. Carlskrona Harbour from a Danish plan, 1852.
17. Aland Isles from a Swedish manuscript. og 1817, 1853.
18. Bomarsund 1834, 1854.
19. Hango Road and Outo Islets and Skars. Swedsish manuscript and charts, 1854.
20. Entrance to the Gulf of Riga. From a Russian Survey. 1846. 1854.
21. Mouth of the River Dvina to Riga. By M. Clesneur 1787. 1854.
22. Entrance to the Gulf of Finland. From Swedish Surveys. 1854.
23. Gulf of Finland. Viborg Bay. From the French. 1809. 1854.
24. Port Baltic or Roghervik Bay. From a manuscript 1822.
25. Revel Road. From a Russian Survey. 1846. 1853.
26. Helingfors Sveaborg and Parts adjacent. From a Swedish manuscript 1837. 1854.
27. Kronstat. From the Russian Survey. 1853.
28. The Bay of St Petersburg. From the Russian Survey 1854. 

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